POPULATION

Entire population of indian origin upcountry tamil people is currently estimated as 1.5 millian. out of this .75 millian people live outside tea estates and elswhere in the country.only 50% of the people live and work at tea estates and this containes of 3800 families.in 1950 ,six decades ago 90% of above population lived and dependants of tea estates . because of lower wage and poor living conditions people are try to find works outside tea estats and distracted from tea industry.if this tendancy continues in for another five decades there going to be hardley any single workers family going to be left inside in a tea estate.

a tea estate with dwelings

a tea estate with dwelings

it is so cold

it is so cold
there is no way out

sun set pictures near galle

sun set pictures near galle

perspective

perspective
imbulpitiya tea estate near nawalapitiya from the distance

new developments

new developments
after 1972when the parliament passed land ceiling act the hill country border plantations were divided into small portions given to sinhala peasants colonnialising the plantation districts.

workers children.....it is difficult to smile

workers children.....it is difficult to smile

Saturday, July 3, 2010

Writer Christine Wilson passes away

The writer and artist Christine Spittel-Wilson passed away on 27th February 2010. Her cremation took place at the General Cemetery, Kanatte. She was 97.
Christine Spittel-Wilson Coming from a family of doctors, artists and writers, she was active as a writer and an artist until comparatively recently. She published her autobiography, “Christine”, in 2007, and gave an exhibition of her paintings and ceramic art in 2009.

She was the author of three novels (“The Bitter Berry”, “The Mountain Road”, and “I Am The Wings”), a biography of her father, Dr. R. L. Spittel, (“Surgeon of the Wilderness”), a cookery book (“Secrets of Eastern Cooking”), and a number of travel and assorted articles. She was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

As a young woman, she accompanied her father into the jungles of Sri Lanka, to gain an understanding of the ancient ways of the Veddhas. In 2008, a delegation of Veddhas made a special trip to Colombo to pay tribute to her. The visit was covered by both TV and print media.

Mrs. Spittel-Wilson spent her childhood and early adult years at Wycherley, the family home on Old Buller’s Road, and studied at the private girls’ school Roedean, in England. Her husband, Major Alistair McNeil-Wilson, passed away in June 2007.

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